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States move to keep court from lifting Trump asylum policy
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States move to keep court from lifting Trump asylum policy

Immigrant rights' groups have argued that the use of Title 42 unjustly harms people fleeing persecution and that the pandemic was a pretext used by the Trump administration to curb immigration. A judge on Nov. 15 ruled for the immigrants rights' groups, calling the ban "arbitrary and capricious."

Unemployment claims rise to 240,000, highest since August
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Unemployment claims rise to 240,000, highest since August

To combat inflation that hit four-decade highs earlier this year, the Federal Reserve has raised its benchmark interest rate six times since March. The housing market has buckled under the strain of mortgage rates that have more than doubled from a year ago. And many economists expect the United States to slip into a recession next year as higher borrowing costs slow economic activity.

Ex-teacher charged with sex crime marries onetime student
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Ex-teacher charged with sex crime marries onetime student

Tucker, who taught and coached at East Limestone High School in north Alabama, was charged in September with being a school employee who engaged in a sex act with a student younger than 19. A court allowed him to be released on $30,000 bond on the condition he have no contact with the onetime student.

Taylor Swift ticket trouble could drive political engagement
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Taylor Swift ticket trouble could drive political engagement

It started Nov. 15, when millions crowded a presale for Swift’s long-awaited Eras Tour, resulting in crashes, prolonged waits and frantic purchases. By Thursday, Ticketmaster had canceled the general sale, citing insufficient remaining tickets and inciting a firestorm of outrage from fans. Swift herself said the ordeal “really pisses me off.”

Consumers could pay price if railroads, unions can’t agree
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Consumers could pay price if railroads, unions can’t agree

The likelihood of a strike that would paralyze the nation's rail traffic grew on Monday when the largest of the 12 rail unions, which represents mostly conductors, rejected management's latest offering that included 24% raises and $5,000 in bonuses. With four of the 12 unions that represent half of the 115,000 rail workers holding out for a better deal, it might fall to Congress to impose one to protect the U.S. economy.